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Stalking generally refers to harassing or threatening behavior that an individual engages in repeatedly, such as following a person (either in person or online), appearing at a person’s home or place of business, making harassing phone calls, leaving written messages or objects, using a third party to get insight or information on a person.

What is Stalking?

Stalking prevents the victim from being able to cut off contact with the abusive partner, which makes it much more difficult for healing to begin.

Stalking is generally understood to be a pattern of behavior directed at a specific person, with the intention to intimidate and frighten the victim.

Stalking generally refers to harassing or threatening behavior that an individual engages in repeatedly, such as following a person (either in person or online), appearing at a person’s home or place of business, making harassing phone calls, leaving written messages or objects, using a third party to get insight or information on a person.

Stalkers often use fake online profiles thinking it will disguise their disturbing behavior.

Research indicates that around 70% of stalkers have some kind of mental defect or personality disorder.

While stalking behaviors can present during any part of an abusive relationship, the study found stalking to be most common after a victim has left the relationship, and women are significantly more likely to be stalked by a spouse or ex-spouse rather than a stranger, acquaintance, relative, or friend.

If you believe you are experiencing stalking, document as much about the behaviors in question as possible to create evidence of a pattern of a behavior, which can be helpful when making a report to law enforcement.

Document anything that makes you feel afraid or uncomfortable, no matter how small it seems.

Stalking can be physical and/or digital, and could include tactics such as:

* making repeated and unwanted phone calls or texts

* sending unwanted letters or emails

* following or spying on you

* showing up wherever you are without a legitimate reason to be there

* driving by or waiting around at places (home, work, school, etc) you frequent

* leaving/sending unwanted items, presents, or flowers for you to find

* posting information or spreading rumors about you on the internet, in a public place, or by word of mouth

* looking through your property (including trash cans, your mail, or your car)

* taking your property

* collecting information about you

* taking pictures of you

* damaging your home, car, or other property

* monitoring your phone calls, email, social media, or other computer use

* using technology, like hidden cameras or GPS, to track you

* threatening to hurt you, your family, friends, or pets

* finding out information by using public records or online search services, hiring investigators

* contacting friends, family, neighbors, or co-workers about you

If you are being stalked you can apply for a protection order, for more information about Protection Orders please click here.

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Currently, the law requires that someone has to be threatened before any legal action can be taken. In instances where the stalking is done by someone with whom the person has had a relationship, the Domestic Violence Act can offer some relief.

Being stalked is horrible.

If you are going through this right now, it is likely that you feel high levels of anxiety, and it’s really difficult for you to settle into getting on with your life.

What is this person doing when they are stalking you?

Are they gathering information on social media to use against you?

Are they following you to try to perform a ‘hoover’ on you?

Do they want to threaten … or even hurt you?

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Whatever it is, ABSOLUTELY one the most disconcerting and frightening things about abuse is STALKING.

You don’t know where he or she could turn up and what drama could ensue.

Traditionally abusers feed off your energy as a shark does blood and get energised to attack you. They feel empowered watching you, knowing what you’re doing and who you’re doing it with.

They’re pathetic. They’re sad, lonely people. You do not need to get yourself worked up over someone so insignificant!

To see how to complete the forms for Protection, please click here.

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